Support and emotional wellbeing


Having a lung transplant is an emotional experience and support is available, if you need it

Key points

  • Having a lung transplant can bring up many emotions
  • You may feel grateful and happy, but you also may feel guilty or depressed
  • There are care groups, counsellors and psychologists who can support you and your loved ones
  • If you feel depressed, anxious or stressed, please ask your transplant doctor or GP for help

It’s normal to feel a rollercoaster of emotions

Having a lung transplant is an emotional experience. Some patients find it very stressful and feel guilty and depressed, while others feel overjoyed. Sometimes, the new medicines you’ll need to take for the transplant can change your mood. If the transplant has not worked well, this can be a particularly difficult and stressful time for you and your loved ones.

Please ask for help

Please tell your transplant team if you or your family or friends have worries or concerns. Transplant centres have counsellors or psychologists, who can help you and your loved ones. Treatment can help you feel better.

Look after your mental health

It’s important to keep yourself mentally healthy. Some patients find that they miss the people and staff that they spent lots of time with prior to their transplant. Others find sex or other relationships difficult after a transplant. Getting back to work can be difficult for some patients. You don’t need to suffer alone. 

Who can help?

Each transplant centre will have services available to support you. These include:

  • Social workers - these can advise on whether you are eligible for any benefits
  • Physiotherapists
  • Occupational therapists
  • Dieticians
  • Pharmacists

Transplant patients associations are also an excellent place to find advice and support. Please ask your transplant team if you would like to speak to other patients about your experiences.

More information



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