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Organ donation key messages


Share the need for more organ donors using our messages below

Use the below text on your websites, social media sites, blogs etc. There is a long version and a short version depending on what space is available to you:

Short copy about Organ Donation

Right now across the UK, there are around 6,000 people in need of an organ transplant, including around 200 children and teenagers. Every day in the UK, someone dies waiting for an organ transplant, because there just aren’t enough organ donors.

For people in black, Asian and ethnic minority communities the situation is even more critical. These patients wait longer for a kidney transplant than white patients due to a shortage of donors from their communities who are more likely to be a suitable match. 

If you donate your organs after you die you could save and improve the lives of up to nine people, and help even more if you donate tissue such as heart valves, skin, bone, tendons and corneas

On 20 May 2020, the law around organ donation in England changed to allow more people to pass on more organs, to save more lives.

Unless you choose to opt out, or are in an excluded group, you will be considered to have agreed to be an organ donor when you die.

Go to www.organdonation.nhs.uk today to record your donation decision, it only takes a few minutes. Please remember to pass it on to your family to help ensure they honour this when the time comes. Ask them whether they want to be donors too.

(Optional paragraph on Organ Donation in Wales)

Consent for Organ Donation in Wales is currently different to the rest of the UK. In Wales, you can become an organ donor by joining the NHS Organ Donor Register (opt in) by telling family and friends or by doing nothing. If you do nothing, you will be treated as having no objection to becoming an organ donor.

If you don’t want to be an organ donor, you can also record this on the NHS Organ Donor Register by visiting www.organdonationwales.org or calling 0300 123 23 23.

 

Find out about organ donation across the rest of the UK

Scotland website https://www.organdonationscotland.org/law-change

Ireland https://www.organdonation.nhs.uk/uk-laws/organ-donation-law-in-northern-ireland/

Crown Dependencies page https://www.organdonation.nhs.uk/uk-laws/organ-donation-law-in-crown-dependencies/

Long copy about Organ Donation

Right now across the UK, there are around 6,000 people in need of an organ transplant, including around 200 children and teenagers. Every day in the UK, someone dies waiting for an organ transplant, because there just aren’t enough organs available.

For people in black, Asian and ethnic minority communities the situation is even more critical. People from black and Asian communities are more likely to develop conditions such as high blood pressure, diabetes and certain forms of hepatitis than white people. This makes them more likely to need a transplant. These patients wait longer for a kidney transplant than white patients due to a shortage of donors from their communities who are more likely to be a suitable match.  

If you donate your organs after you die you could save and improve the lives of up to nine people, and help even more if you donate tissue such as heart valves, skin, bone, tendons and corneas.

Only around 5000 people across the UK each year die in circumstances where they could donate their organs.

On 20 May 2020, the law around organ donation in England changed to allow more people to pass on more organs, to save more lives.

Unless you choose to opt out, or are in an excluded group, you will be considered to have agreed to be an organ donor when you die.

Those excluded will be people under 18, people who lack mental capacity to understand the new arrangements and take the necessary action, people who have lived in England for less than 12 months or who are not living here voluntarily.

Adults covered by the change will still have a choice whether they want to be an organ donor, and their families will still be involved before organ donation goes ahead.

We need as many people as possible to register their decision whether or not they want to be an organ donor. That way if someone dies in circumstances where their organs or tissue could be used to help others, authorised NHS Blood and Transplant staff can see what they wanted to happen. You can register your decision on the NHS Organ Donor Register www.organdonation.nhs.uk and by telling your family to support what you want.

We know many people don’t want to think about their own death. But patients waiting for a transplant depend on people of all ages thinking about whether they want to save lives when they die and registering their decision to become a donor. 
If you want to save lives, your age and any medical conditions you have, should not stop you from signing up as a donor and telling your family that you want them to support your decision to donate.

Go to www.organdonation.nhs.uk today to record your donation decision, it only takes a few minutes. Please remember to pass it on to your family to help ensure they honour this when the time comes. Ask them whether they want to be donors too.

(Optional paragraph for Organ Donation in Wales)

Consent for Organ Donation in Wales is currently different to the rest of the UK. In Wales, you can become an organ donor by joining the NHS Organ Donor Register (opt in) by telling family and friends or by doing nothing. If you do nothing, you will be treated as having no objection to becoming an organ donor.

If you don’t want to be an organ donor, you can also record this on the NHS Organ Donor Register by visiting www.organdonationwales.org or calling 0300 123 23 23.

 

Find out about organ donation across the rest of the UK

Scotland website https://www.organdonationscotland.org/law-change

Ireland https://www.organdonation.nhs.uk/uk-laws/organ-donation-law-in-northern-ireland/

Crown Dependencies page https://www.organdonation.nhs.uk/uk-laws/organ-donation-law-in-crown-dependencies/